Quantitative survey

Create a quantitative survey questionnaire easy and simple

If you need to do a survey, for example a customer satisfaction survey, a market analysis, a quality survey or other types of surveys, there are a number of methodological choices you need to make before designing your survey. Overall, two directions can be distinguished when we talk about the methodological approach to a study. These two methods are the qualitative method and the quantitative method. In this article, we take a closer look at the quantitative study.

Qualitative or quantitative studies


Before we throw ourselves over the quantitative method, however, we must dwell for a brief moment on the two methodological directions qualitative studies and quantitative studies.
The qualitative methods are used primarily when examining conditions that cannot be measured immediately. For example, it may be the culture of a company or a communication process that needs to be examined. In such cases, one will typically use qualitative methods in the form of, for example, loosely structured interviews, participant observations or other methods where one has the opportunity to pursue various issues that are uncovered during the study. The qualitative survey is best suited if you have few respondents and you want to go in depth with a theme.
The quantitative method, on the other hand, is better at examining what a large group of respondents example think about something. The quantitative method is, for example, the one used when a polling institute asks Danes what they think about a current topic or who they would vote for if there were parliamentary elections tomorrow.

The quantitative method is thus very suitable if a fixed question frame can be set up and you want answers from many people - a larger quantity - than you can get with the qualitative method.

The Quantitative survey


Quantitative survey image 1
One of the tools that is the epitome of the quantitative method is questionnaires or surveys, as it is called in modern Danish. A questionnaire can be set up in many ways and it can take many forms. The quantitative questionnaire is characterized by the fact that answer options are defined in advance. For example, you may have to rate a product on a scale of 1 to 5 or answer whether an advertisement gives the respondent a greater desire to buy a product or service. Although the quantitative questionnaire is structured with closed questions, it is also possible to supplement with an open field where the respondent can elaborate on his answer.

Quantitative market research


The quantitative questionnaire, for example, is suitable for conducting market research. Market research can be used in several contexts. An example where it is relevant to launch a market research is if your company would like to launch a new product in a new market. By doing a market research, you have the opportunity to research what potential customers think about the product before launching it. You can do this by uncovering all the information about the market that is relevant to make your decision, including the customers' preferences. If you do not have an insight into customers' habits, you basically do not know if your product will be able to be sold. Therefore, it makes very good sense to do a quantitative market analysis before launching a new product.

Quantitative customer loyalty surveys


Quantitative survey image 2
However, the quantitative questionnaire is not only suitable for market analyzes, it is also particularly suitable for questionnaire surveys that uncover customers' behavior more broadly. Customer loyalty is a key word for many companies, which is the "bottom line" in having loyal customers who keep returning to your company. However, loyal customers do not come by themselves. To get loyal customers, you need to constantly keep your finger on the pulse and know what parts of your product your customers value so that you can optimize your business on an ongoing basis. You do this best by doing a qualitative survey of customer loyalty via a questionnaire.
A customer loyalty questionnaire can, for example, contain questions about the service they have received in connection with a purchase, the quality of the product itself or their attitude towards your brand. A rule of thumb, however, is that you should limit the number of sf questions so you do not spread out too much. If your customers have to spend 20 minutes filling out the form, there is a great risk that you will not get very many answers. Think of the phrase "need to know and nice to know". In this case, go for "Need to know" so ask the questions that are really important for you to draw some conclusions from the study.

Qualitative or quantitative studies


Before we throw ourselves over the quantitative method, however, we must dwell for a brief moment on the two methodological directions qualitative studies and quantitative studies.
The qualitative methods are used primarily when examining conditions that cannot be measured immediately. For example, it may be the culture of a company or a communication process that needs to be examined. In such cases, one will typically use qualitative methods in the form of, for example, loosely structured interviews, participant observations or other methods where one has the opportunity to pursue various issues that are uncovered during the study. The qualitative study is best suited if you have few respondents and you want to go in depth with a theme.
The quantitative method, on the other hand, is better at examining what a large group of respondents example think about something. The quantitative method is, for example, the one used when a polling institute asks Danes what they think about a current topic or who they would vote for if there were parliamentary elections tomorrow. The quantitative method is thus very suitable if a fixed question frame can be set up and you want answers from many people - a larger quantity - than you can get with the qualitative method.

The Quantitative survey


One of the tools that is the epitome of the quantitative method is questionnaires or surveys, as it is called in modern Danish. A questionnaire can be set up in many ways and it can take many forms. The quantitative questionnaire is characterized by the fact that answer options are defined in advance. For example, you may have to rate a product on a scale of 1 to 5 or answer whether an advertisement gives the respondent a greater desire to buy a product or service. Although the quantitative questionnaire is structured with closed questions, it is also possible to supplement with an open field where the respondent can elaborate on his answer.

Quantitative market research


The quantitative questionnaire, for example, is suitable for conducting market research. Market research can be used in several contexts. An example where it is relevant to launch a market research is if your company would like to launch a new product in a new market. By doing a market research, you have the opportunity to research what potential customers think about the product before launching it. You can do this by uncovering all the information about the market that is relevant to make your decision, including the customers' preferences. If you do not have an insight into customers' habits, you basically do not know if your product will be able to be sold. Therefore, it makes very good sense to do a quantitative market analysis before launching a new product.

Quantitative customer loyalty surveys


However, the quantitative questionnaire is not only suitable for market analyzes, it is also particularly suitable for questionnaire surveys that uncover customers' behavior more broadly. Customer loyalty is a key word for many companies, which is the "bottom line" in having loyal customers who keep returning to your company. However, loyal customers do not come by themselves. To get loyal customers, you need to constantly keep your finger on the pulse and know what parts of your product your customers value so that you can optimize your business on an ongoing basis. You do this best by doing a qualitative survey of customer loyalty via a questionnaire.
A customer loyalty questionnaire can, for example, contain questions about the service they have received in connection with a purchase, the quality of the product itself or their attitude towards your brand. A rule of thumb, however, is that you should limit the number of sf questions so you do not spread out too much. If your customers have to spend 20 minutes filling out the form, there is a great risk that you will not get very many answers. Think of the phrase "need to know and nice to know". In this case, go for "Need to know" so ask the questions that are really important for you to draw some conclusions from the study.

Get started on quantitative research


In this article, we have given you an introduction to what quantitative method is for a size and how you can apply quantitative methods in your business. If you have questions about how to get the most out of quantitative questionnaire surveys, do not hesitate to contact us, we are ready to help you.

Get started on quantitative research


In this article, we have given you an introduction to what quantitative method is for a size and how you can apply quantitative methods in your business. If you have questions about how to get the most out of quantitative questionnaire surveys, do not hesitate to contact us, we are ready to help you.

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